Monthly Archives: September 2013

Graduate photo

Crank Up The ‘Pomp And Circumstance:’ American Graduate Day Is Saturday


The national American Graduate public media initiative gets its own day Saturday — you can watch a live broadcast here or on your TV’s KERA World 13.2 channel from 11 a.m. to 6 p.m. Central time. The seven-hour broadcast will feature notables ranging from Colin Powell to Brian Williams to Christine Ha, a star chef from Houston who’s also blind.

The folks behind the initiative are also producing a “Storify” of the many social media streams feeding this effort. You can get in on the conversation by tweeting with the hashtag #amgrad. (If you toss in #KERAClassof17, your tweet will also show up on our blog!) Read More

More Dallas Students Took SAT Tests But Few Hit The Benchmark


Fewer than 20% of all Dallas seniors in 2013 met the critical reading benchmark, according to the SAT scores just out. That means more than 80% missed it.

29% met the benchmark in math, and only 16.1% met it in writing.

Among African Americans who took the 2013 test, only 13% hit the reading benchmark. In math, nearly 19% scored the benchmark, and fewer than 10% hit the benchmark in writing.

Fewer than 20% of Hispanic seniors in 2013 hit the benchmarks in reading and writing, while slightly more, nearly 30% hit it in math.

Among White students, more than 60% of 2013 seniors hit the benchmarks in reading math, and writing.

More DISD kids in total took the SAT in 2013 than they did two years ago.

Looking at ethnic breakdowns, more Hispanics took the test, 509, than took it two years ago.

However, 76 fewer DISD African American students, and 14 fewer White students took the test in 2013 than took it in 2011.

Kelly Hauser (left) and Matthew Carter (right) learn about teaching math and science to students who don't speak English at a workshop held at the University of North Texas. Dawn Osborne, a consultant for Region 10 Education Service Center, helps explain some of those strategies.

Learning How To Teach Kids Who Don’t Speak English


Kelly Hauser (left) and Matthew Carter (right) learn about teaching math and science to students who don't speak English at a workshop held at the University of North Texas. Dawn Osborne, a consultant for Region 10 Education Service Center, helps explain some of those strategies.

Rosanna Boyd/University of North Texas

Kelly Hauser (left) and Matthew Carter (right) learn about teaching math and science to students who don’t speak English at a workshop held at the University of North Texas. Dawn Osborne, a consultant for Region 10 Education Service Center, helps explain some of those strategies.

More than 800,000 students whose first language is not English attend Texas public schools. About a quarter of them are in North Texas classrooms. The challenge for many educators is figuring out the best way to teach these students. A hotly-debated question is whether they should learn English through immersion or some other technique such as bilingual education.

Last week, teachers from the Denton Independent School District attended a two-day workshop at the University of North Texas to learn strategies for teaching math and science to non-English speakers.

Read More

photo 4

‘Mr. South Oak Cliff’ Enjoying College But Missing Home


Jarrell Brown is enjoying his first semester at Howard University. But he says he misses his family and Texas-style food.

Stella M. Chávez/KERA News

Jarrell Brown is enjoying his first semester at Howard University in Washington, D.C. But he says he misses his family and Texas-style food.

Jarrell Brown made an impression last month as one of the stars of Student Speak Out: A KERA American Graduate Special. During the hourlong TV show, he and five of his peers asked each other questions and talked about what it takes to graduate from high school.

Last year, Jarrell was senior class president at Dallas’ South Oak Cliff High School. This fall, he just wrapped up his first month at Howard University in Washington, D.C., where he’s majoring in biology and ultimately hopes to become a pre-med student. We caught up with him on campus last week. He says it’s going well so far, but he’s starting to feel a little homesick.

Read More

Dallas School Board Considers Superintendent’s Future


Protesters outside the Dallas School District Administration building called on the school board to fire Miles.The Board went behind closed doors at 5:42 this evening to hear from the Superintendent for the first time after an independent investigation found he violated district policy in an effort to discredit board members in the media.Miles has said he wants to renew a good relationship with the Board.Trustees could decide tonight whether to fire Miles, discipline him, or move on.

Read more at KERA News

Dallas Teachers Turn Up The Heat On Embattled Superintendent Mike Miles


For the first time in more than 35 years, the largest teachers' group in Dallas, Alliance AFT, is calling for the district’s superintendent to be fired.The demand comes just hours before tonight’s school board meeting, where Mike Miles will be on the hot seat. He'll be responding publicly for the first time to an investigation that found he interfered with an investigation into a district contract, and helped write a letter that criticized board members.

Read more at KERA News

State School Board Undecided on What Courses Should Count for Graduation (Update)


Update: State Sen. Dan Patrick, R-Houston, spoke and answered questions regarding House Bill 5 in front of the State Board of Education today.Patrick’s endorsement of the bill, which provides for different paths to high school graduation, was met with skepticism from board member Patricia Hardy. Hardy’s concern revolved around the removal of social studies classes from high school graduation requirements. She argued that turning social studies courses into electives limits a student’s exposure to important information.

Read more at KERA News
R Load more posts